Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesPhilosophy · 1 month ago

Gettier, “Is Justified True Belief Knowledge?” What are the necessary and sufficient conditions for knowledge?

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  • 1 month ago

    No, his thing was you can have a "justified" true belief, and in fact be right, but you didn't have knowledge even so. Example. I slip a five dollar bill into your shirt pocket without your knowledge. You go into your room for a while and come back out and I say I "know" you have a five dollar bill in your shirt pocket. And you do. But, unbeknownst to me, you changed shirts in your room, and put your own five in your own pocket of the new shirt. So I was "right" than you had five bucks, but for an invalidly "justified" reason.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Since you apparently failed to read the material assigned by your professor, here is a chance to catch up: http://www.reading.ac.uk/AcaDepts/ld/Philos/jmp/Th...

    Source(s): Google. It has existed for more than 20 years. Learn to use it.
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  • j153e
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Personally, do not find Gettier's premise and examples relevant and logically clear.  If "justified" is "justified," then true belief is true belief.

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  • 1 month ago

    In my opinion, the only thing a person can know is their own thoughts.

    The justified, and true (I prefer to use the word, "correct" rather than the word,  "true"), requirements are problematic.

    According to my opinion, the only defining requirement of knowledge is belief. One's own thoughts and beliefs may be unjustified and/or incorrect, yet they are the only things one knows. 

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