Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Home & GardenMaintenance & Repairs · 1 month ago

why does the hissing sound stop at my house water filter and well pressure tank when I shut off the water inlet valve from the pump?

I've replaced the pressure switch and pressure gauge to the system, but the pump continuously runs and won't pressurize the system above 55psi.  The cut-out setting is 60psi.

5 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Air side of pressure tank or bladder or air valve/volume control valve could be leaking.  There could also be a leak in the line.  Call a plumber.

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  • Edwena
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    You probably have the old style tank with the float valve and no air bladder. They are generally galvanized and not painted the bright blue. The hissing sound is air coming out of the air hole in the float valve switch.  Put your finger over the hole and the sound should stop. What it means is that your water tank is "water logged". Shut off you pump and drain your pressure tank completely of water. Open up one of the fittings and be sure the tank is full of air. Then close up the tank and turn the pump back on. The tank will pressure back up and have the right amount of air in it to work correctly. This happens every few years with the old style tank, so think about adding valves on the tank to make things simpler. The new style tanks have a bladder in them to prevent this problem. Also, your well could be getting low on water and you need to lower the pump deeper into the well.

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  • 1 month ago

    sounds as if there is a pinhole leak in the bladder inside the pressure tank -- it only opens when the pressure gets to 55 psi. For single story houses, 40 psi is enough. so you might get by for a while yet if you dial the pressure down to 40 psi.

    pressure tanks work by pushing relatively incompressable water again highly compressible air. the bladder [it's rubber] is what separates the two.

    yes, it can be replaced. no, doesn't seem as if that's a DIY task for you. local handyman who has experience with wells and related equipment might be able to do it and he'll be cheaper than the well service technician.

    Source(s): grampa
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  • 1 month ago

    I, too, would suspect a leak.

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  • y
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    You have a leak in the line.

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