What should I teach my little brother in Kindergarten after subtracting double digit numbers?

My little brother is pretty good at math and I'm not sure how to go about teaching him. He's in kindergarten and right now they are learning to subtract one. Because of the pandemic learning has been online and he has to do this google slides presentation every day. I was a swim instructor in college so I've been in charge of his education and teaching him because I've had the most experience with teaching. Right now his class is learning subtracting 1 from a given number so 4-1=.I taught him this about two weeks ago and he thinks it's so boring because he knows how to do it. He does math worksheets on it and practices his writing. He can already subtract and add double-digit numbers so what do I teach him next? My other siblings and I are so impressed with his math skills. When he does a worksheet correct we're always like "wow, you're so smart." We hype him up every chance we get. He has a lot of confidence in math and I think it's because of us hyping him up so much. I'm just not sure what the next step is. Is it multiplication? It seems a little too hard for a kindergartner. I tried for like a minute to teach him multiplication, but he didn't pick it up as fast as addition or subtraction so we kept doing subtraction for a while. I don't mind being patient and trying to teach him multiplication, but should we do negative numbers instead? We only do problems where the answer is positive so like 17-15=. Should we switch it up and it be 15-17=-2? Is this the next step?

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  • 1 month ago

    I would not confuse him with negative numbers so early but you could get him a times table poster and teach him the very basic multiplication samples.  I assume you are using beads or similar items so he can visualise problems instead of rote learning.  I think he would actually enjoy multiplication.  If it is not fun for him don’t press or he will get bored very soon.  I agree with the other poster about reading.  Let him select his own books and read stories to him that he enjoys to foster a love of reading, so he will teach himself to read.  My son was reading at three because of his own interest in doing so, no pressure from me at all.  I used to read to him every day and visited the library every week.  Don’t forget the fine motor skills as learning to write, draw and

    use scissors are just as important.  

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  • 1 month ago

    Try different things, and if he catches on to the concept then keep going with it.

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  • 1 month ago

    It's great that you're doing math. I have to tell you as the mother of another kid who is good at math that the problem with introducing them to new stuff is that they're bored with what they're doing at school. However, all the research says that the key to academic success is reading, because reading is essential to the study of most subject (even math). Are you reading to him? That's probably the best thing you can do. Get him interested in books. Find books that interest him, whatever he's interested in. My child has read every Pokemon book, and every Captain Underpants. Here's the interesting thing- because he's not going to school anymore, he's staying up late at night and sleeping during the day. Bad, right? Except that he reads books to put himself to sleep, and that's probably going to help him more than anything he would have done at school. 

    • Michael1 month agoReport

      We read for 20 minutes everyday, but he HATES it. He likes comic books though. Is it ok? I mean it's still reading right? His reading is not at the same level as his math skills. I also don't know if I should read to him or if he should be reading to himself. 

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Next, teach him how to make a decent Martini and how to pick up girls.

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