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Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 2 months ago

Why did people on the 1700s have a peachy colored complexion tone?

Why was this, possibly lack of sun in the little ice age. George Washington didn’t get much sun at valley forge in the winter.

What is the reason for this coloration in the 1700s British queens and such in the 1600s also had this coloration.

Is it the little ice age, all the classical composers had this coloration in paintings, why is this coloration so prevalent. What is the reason?

Update:

What was the reason for the “classical period complexion tone” there was clearly some environmental factor. Was it just from some primitive sunscreen before we had modern sun tan lotion. 

Update 2:

The portrait of sir Francis drake also shows this peachy hue on cheeks. Was this early sunscreen used in this period. Surely sailors would need sun teen.

Update 3:

Was the iradescent hues seen in portraits of ancient Egyptians possibly also some ancient quasi reflective substance with sunscreen like qualities. 

Update 4:

Was the sunscreen used to protect delegate eyelid skin in Egyptian times made from some blue mineral. Did romans use sunscreen.

17 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    You're only getting an artist's rendition. There are plenty of paintings f/ that era that resemble flesh tones today. Do you think people had peachy complexions when photography was only black and white?

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  • 2 months ago

    You must have some very strange peaches where you live.

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  • ?
    Lv 4
    2 months ago

    The slaves didn't

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Sunscreen? WTF is that.?  Peachy complextion is working out in the sun all day doing physical work.  Not stuck indoors.  The pale look belonged to the UNDERTAKERs who worked indoors and worked nights.

     A rosy complextion is oxygen blood in the cheeks, which is still evident today in people that play outdoor sports and do landscaping jobs.   

    . Egyptians used colored pigments to paint their faces for ritual events.  Most of them were the coloration of Mexican or darker as that is Northern Africa.  Cleopatra is closer to present day than when the Last pyramid was built...which was not at the beginning of Egypt (meaning it has a LONG history).  

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Neither you or anyone you ever knew was alive then; how do you know what their skin tones were?

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  • Lili
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    We don't know that they did, sweetie.  Painters used flesh tones that may not have matched actual skin tones.

    There's no such thing as a "classical period skin tone".  European people's complexions ranged in tone, just as they do today.

    See a shrink and get a better education. You clearly need both.

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  • JOHN B
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    The cameras were first generation, low tech. Not what we have today.

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  • 2 months ago

    Because it was difficult those hundreds of years ago to get the exact pigments to paint with. Artists had to make do with what they had.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Go out on a really cold day, spend an hour or two standing in a field. Do your cheeks and nose have a distinct red glow? Where are your facial blood vessels most numerous and closest to the skin?

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Valley Forge is in Pennsylvania, I live in Pennsylvania, we don't get much sun in any winter.

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