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D. asked in PetsBirds · 2 months ago

Bird biting when being put in cage?

I have a Senegal parrot who loves me and is always eager to come out and sit on my shoulder and/or play.  He does not like when I am done and he has to go back in his cage.  He bites me when I try to do this, and bites hard such that the only way to unlatch him to fling him off, into the cage, where he is then left for at least an hour before he is taken out again.  However, this is not discouraging him to bite the next time.  In fact, this is becoming more frequent to the point where it is every time I take him out and put him away.  How can I get this to stop?

6 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    How long did you have him out?  He probably figures you aren't being fair with him.  Leave him out for half a day.  When you want to take him back, tell him why.  Tell him that you will take him out again but you have to go out now.  Talk sweetly.  Works like a charm.

    Source(s): My birds are out most of the day.
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  • 2 months ago

    Grab the bird from behind it's head around the neck with a hand towel while it's on your other arm and guide it into the cage. Tell it time for birdie cage every time you do that and sooner or later it will get used to going into the cage when he hears those words.

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  • 2 months ago

    Hurting him when you put the bird back, even if the bird 'started it' is wrong.  You have been teaching the bird it will get hurt when it goes back to the cage.  You solve this by making the cage 'his'.  The cage should be a happy place full of toys and goodies to eat.  

    You will fix this quickest by no longer giving him his favorite treats when with you.  Instead, when it comes time to put the bird back - you let it watch you put the treats inside the cage - this way he has a reason to go back.  

    My birds, I just put my shoulder to the cage and say, "Down, down" and they run of my shoulder and onto a platform.  I always praise them for going back the cage when told and I spend a few extra minutes petting to rubbing the back of their neck.

    "Up,up" and "Down, down" are two very important commands you should have taught your bird the first week you got it.  Someone opens the front door, or, something happens in the room that can be dangerous to the bird - you need to put it at the cage door and say 'Down, down' and it needs to hop it like its little tail is on fire.  

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  • patty
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    my budgie is out for half the day or more if i am out. Maybe he needs to be out longer

    • D.2 months agoReport

      Thank you for the suggestion.  He's out a few hours a day.  Lately more (around 4 hours a day).  Again, no one else in my family has an issue putting him away in the cage.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Never be aggressive towards your bird for punishment. The nicer approach would work. Give some treats your bird can't resist in the cage when you want the bird to go into the cage. Then your bird will figure out eventually,  "hey, every time I go into my cage, i get a treat!" And the cage will become and be seen as a good thing to your bird. 

    I hope this helps. 

    Source(s): I had a ton of parrots growing up.
    • D.2 months agoReport

      Thank you for the suggestion!  When the biting first started I tried this, but I ran out of treats, and the biting came back worse.  Is there a long term solution?

      There is no "aggressive" flinging.  It is literally the force required to dislodge the beak from my flesh (and never any more).

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Maybe if you'd stop hurting him by FLINGING him into his cage he'd be less afraid of his cage.

    • D.2 months agoReport

      Of course if there was any other way to get him off, I would!  But when he bites he tends to go for blood.  He will not let go until a hunk of flesh has come out.


      Plus, it doesn't seem like the issue is the cage.  Other family members play and put him back in the cage and have no issue at all.

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