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does baking powder act like yeast when making bread dough?

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  • Mark
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    They are both leavening, but they give different results.  Compare "raised doughnuts" (yeast) to "cake doughnuts" (baking powder) for a good example.

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  • 1 month ago

    Not for ordinary bread--yeast raised breads are made with yeast for a reason. The yeast makes the dough raise and gives the bread a lofty texture. BUT--here's a recipe you can use if you don't have yeast and want homemade bread very quickly:

    Beer bread

    3 cups self-rising flour (USE ONLY SELF-RISING FLOUR!)

    1 bottle or can (12 ounces) of any beer

    a pinch of sugar

    Mix well until it makes a sticky dough. Pour into a well-greased loaf pan. Bake for 45-55 minutes at 350F. 

    Voila--homemade bread!  A lot of different flavorings can be added--such as herbs or seeds. The beer you use will impart no "beer" taste and the alcohol will cook away. This is the quickest bread you can make with the fewest ingredients. 

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  • 1 month ago

    No it does not.

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  • 1 month ago

    nope but it is a leavening.

    Yeast has to be activated by warmth, liquid and time.

    Baking powder is activated by liquid.

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  • IvaB
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    No....................

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  • 1 month ago

    Yes and no. Baking powder is a combination of an acid and a base (usually baking soda and cream of tartar) that foam up and release carbon dioxide to leaven the bread. Yeast, on the other hand, is living organisms that feed on sugar and are limited by salt. But yeast also releases gasses that leaven the dough. They act alike, but they are not interchangeable and use totally different processes to make dough rise.

  • Clive
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    It has the same effect, in that it gives off gas that makes your mixture rise, but it does it a totally different way.

    Baking powder is simply sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) plus a mild acid, usually cream of tartar, that will react together when they get wet and produce carbon dioxide gas.  It's fairly simple chemistry.  I remember this from chemistry lessons - acid + a bicarbonate = a salt + carbon dioxide + water.

    Yeast, on the other hand, is a living thing.  It's a microscopic fungus that will feed on sugar and starch in the mixture and excretes alcohol and carbon dioxide.  The alcohol will evaporate off or boil away in the oven and it's the gas you want to make your bread rise.  Yes, you're relying on yeast farts.  Gluten in the flour forms a protein network as you knead it and traps the gas to give you light, spongy bread.  And yeast will keep on doing this as long as you feed it, but it's not an instant chemical reaction like baking powder makes, so your bread dough needs time to rise.  An hour or longer would be normal.  And for a more even rise, you would punch it down after an hour, shape it into loaves or rolls, leave those to rise for another hour, then bake.

    What if you tried it the other way round?  My German friend is a trained pastrychef and he makes cakes with yeast, but they do tend to be kind of bready.  Still nice, but German cakes aren't quite the same as others.

    And you can make bread with baking powder, and it will be a lot quicker because it doesn't need any rising time, but it will tend to be dense.  If you want fresh bread in a hurry, the way to do it is make soda bread.  No yeast, the usual recipe uses baking soda and buttermilk instead.  Buttermilk is slightly acid so it does the same job as cream of tartar does in baking powder.  Again, it's nice, but not the same as bread made with yeast.

    Just for fun, I saw a documentary on a bread factory and that showed where they got the yeast from.  The yeast factory starts with a tiny amount of yeast and feeds it loads of sugar.  Gobble, gobble, the yeast eats like mad, doubles and splits every few hours, and after a few days they have tons of the stuff.  All the factory has to do is keep it at a temperature it likes, feed it and wait.  Just like farming - they aren't making it, just looking after it so it can grow.  It can also survive for several months if you dry it, but not for longer or it dies - so dried yeast is the one thing where you DO need to watch the date on the pack.  My mother gave up on making bread and I'm sure the failures were because the yeast was too old.

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  • Mr. P
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Yes, although the result doesn't taste the same. 

    Baking powder was invented as a yeast substitute.

    Baking powder produces the bubbles that yeast would normally do, but does have a different taste.

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  • 1 month ago

    Some bread recipes call for baking powder but you will not get a traditional bread using it.  To get a bread with a lot of structure you will need yeast to give it the rise that you expect in a bread. 

    "Tea bread" like banana bread, zucchini bread, pumpkin bread all use baking powder as does cornbread and some others. 

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  • CB
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    In some ways the both work the same, both put off bubbles of CO2, the yeast however eat sugar, piss alcohol and fart CO2. The baking powder just reacts with acid to form CO2.

    Therefore yeast bring additional smells and flavors to whatever it is feasting on and it can eat until it runs out of usable sugar, like baking powder only works until the amount of acid is reduced. 

    Baking powder also adds sodium to the product - that may or may not be a wanted ingredient for health issues....but we are splitting hairs now.

    Baking powder is the same as baking soda with a powdered acid supply (cream of Tarter). Baking soda need some acid from the liquid added to the product - but essentially the same chemical reactions.

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